The 11 Best Softshell Jackets for Women

The Ascendant Hoody was extremely warm for how little it weighed. We were impressed.
Overwhelmed by options? To help you narrow it down, we researched the 75 most popular softshell jackets on the market and extensively tested 11 of them side-by-side. To adequately assess each one, we romped through all manner of fall and winter weather from the Pacific Ocean to the Rocky Mountains. We visited icy alpine glaciers, windy rock faces, and snow-covered trails, putting these softshells through the gamut. We wore them walking and cycling all over town and even straight into the shower to test their water resistance, all the while comparing and contrasting every aspect and feature. Whether you're looking for a do-it-all softshell, something more specialized, or just want a bargain, we've got you covered. Read on to find the ideal match for your unique lifestyle.

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Test Results and Ratings

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Analysis and Award Winners


Review by:
Penney Garrett
Senior Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Tuesday
December 26, 2017

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Updated December 2017
Investing in a softshell jacket can serve you in a multitude of ways. This fall, we added 11 models to our fleet. The Arc'teryx Gamma MX stole the show, taking home the grand prize of our Editors' Choice award. Following close behind, we've award two Top Pick awards, one to the Outdoor Research Ascendant Hoody and another to the Arc'teryx Gamma LT Hoody. We also have two Best Buy winners, the Outdoor Research Ferrosi Crosstown and Marmot Moblis, one costing $99, the other ringing in at $185.

Best Overall Women's Softshell Jacket


Arc'teryx Gamma MX Hoody - Women's


Editors' Choice Award

$349.00
at Backcountry
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Weight: 17.1 oz | Number of pockets: 4 (2 hand, 1 chest, 1 sleeve)
Stretchy, comfortable fit
Excellent mobility
Highly breathable
Helmet-compatible hood
Expensive
Cuffs are tight and not adjustable
The Arc'teryx Gamma MX Hoody proved to be the epitome of our desires in a softshell once again. For the second time in a row, it takes home our Editors' Choice Award - despite some stiff competition. This softshell jacket is comfortable, supple, and moves well during all kinds of activities. The fit is non-restrictive, it's highly breathable, and it provides adequate weather protection. There are better contenders for specific sports like ice climbing, but we found this one to be the top performing model across the most activities. Take it hiking, climbing, or cross-country skiing, and it will excel. It even looks nice if you want to throw it on to head out for a day of running errands around town. On the pricey end of the spectrum, the Gamma MX is a high-end model of what we would call a luxury layer. If you want the most versatile, best-of-the-best, this is the softshell for you.

Read review: Arc'teryx Gamma MX Hoody - Women's

Best Bang for the Buck


Marmot Moblis - Women's


Best Buy Award

$101.72
at Backcountry
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Weight: 21.4 oz | Number of pockets: 4 (2 hand, 1 chest, 1 sleeve)
Windproof
Soft fleece liner
Good mobility
Adjustable cuffs
Heavy
Not as breathable due to windproof material
Hood not helmet compatible
The Marmot Moblis is our Best Buy Award winner because it strikes a perfect balance between price point, and a well-executed, feature-rich softshell jacket. While it certainly wasn't the cheapest piece in our review, it offered almost everything a basic softshell should without completely breaking the bank. The cheaper jackets in our review simply fell too short in one area or another. The Moblis has a soft inner liner and was one of only two windproof models tested. These features decreased its breathability a bit, but it also made for an incredibly warm jacket. And even though we were disappointed with the hood not being helmet compatible, not everyone seeks a contender that is helmet compatible. We also love the adjustable cuffs, four zippered pockets, and special underarm design to increase mobility. Overall, this is a solid softshell for the price.

Read review: Marmot Moblis - Women's

Best Bang for the Buck on a Tight Budget


Outdoor Research Ferrosi Crosstown Hoody - Women's


Best Buy Award

$59.21
at Amazon
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Weight: 10.9 oz | Number of pockets: 2 no zip hand
Lightweight
Excellent mobility
Durable material
Very thin
No zippers on hand pockets
Barely water repellent
For a simple layer that won't strain your wallet too much, we like the Outdoor Research Ferrosi Crosstown Hoody. This hip, sweatshirt-styled layer is extremely lightweight, comfortable, and surprisingly durable, especially considering how thin it is. Even after squeezing and shimmying up some awkward off-width climbs, this model still looked brand new. While this is not a very technical piece and lacks zippers on the pockets, an adjustable hem or cuffs, and any manner of insulation, it's still a fun layer to have around for casual not-too-chilly days. It's exceptional for mild weather trail runs and bike rides and could be your go-to layer for summer sun protection. Keep in mind though that if there's any chance of cold or wind, it's best to go for a different model. At $99, the Ferrosi is worth recognizing, but it is indeed an extra luxury layer that shouldn't be your first consideration if you want a diverse softshell that can handle cold weather.

Read review: Outdoor Research Ferrosi Crosstown Hoody - Women's

Top Pick Award for Warmth


Outdoor Research Ascendant Hoody - Women's


Top Pick Award

$182.75
at Amazon
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Weight: 11.5 oz | Number of pockets: 3 (2 no zip hand, 1 chest)
Excellent weather protection
Lightweight
Impressive breathability
Outer material is very fragile
No zippers on hand pockets
Thumb loops are poorly executed
The Outdoor Research Ascendant Hoody is a seriously impressive hybrid jacket. When we first laid eyes on it, we thought it would fall short across the board, but we ended up surprised at every turn. It functioned well as a softshell in all aspects except durability, and also provided the warmth and coziness of a thin down puffy. Every time we pulled it on in the cold, we felt an instant layer of warmth surround us without having to generate that heat for ourselves as you do with most softshells. We worried that the fuzzy interior would impede breathability, but it didn't - the Ascendant breathed and moved amazingly well, from icy glaciers to super windy crags. It also repelled water impressively, though the lack of zippers on the pockets does mean that water and snow can collect in there. Our only issue with this model was its lack of durability when up against sharp or rough surfaces. The outer material is thin and easily damaged, so while this is a fantastic layer for cold hikes and belaying, you probably won't want to wear it climbing.

Read review: Outdoor Research Ascendant Hoody - Women's

Top Pick Award for Rock Climbing


Arc'teryx Gamma LT Hoody - Women's


Top Pick Award

$249.00
at MooseJaw
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Weight: 15.3 oz | Number of pockets: 3 (2 hand, 1 internal)
Lightweight
Durable
Helmet-compatible hood
Excellent breathability
Cuffs are not adjustable
Not the warmest
The Arc'teryx Gamma LT is a lightweight, flattering, all-around impressive softshell. We found it to consistently be one of our top choices for aerobic hikes and rock climbing due to its lack of bulkiness, excellent breathability, and easy mobility. While the cuffs aren't adjustable, they are shaped well and stay put when pushed up to the forearms, and we were able to access the pockets with a harness on. The material is abrasion-resistant and had no problem withstanding scraping through canyons and off-width chimneys. We also found that the Gamma LT was excellent at repelling water due to its DWR finish. With very low temperatures or high winds, we felt the thinness of this jacket, so you may need to be prepared to layer strategically in more extreme weather, but in milder conditions, this is a fantastic softshell to invest in.

Read review: Arc'teryx Gamma LT - Women's

Notable for Movement


Black Diamond Dawn Patrol Shell - Women's



$198.95
at MooseJaw
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Weight: 20.2 oz | Number of pockets: 4 (2 hand, 2 no zip internal)
Very stretchy
Wide adjustable cuffs
Durable
Large helmet-compatible hood
Baggier fit
Not super warm
Not the best water resistance
You can tell that Black Diamond had climbing and skiing in mind when they designed the Dawn Patrol. Constructed with four-way stretch material and underarm gussets, this layer feels more like you're wearing a comfy sweatshirt than a jacket. Its helmet-compatible hood is large and doesn't constrict head movements at all, and the harness-compatible pockets mean you can access a snack even when all racked up and ready to go. We found the fit to be a bit baggy, but this also means that you can easily layer underneath it to help boost the warmth-factor if needed. With great breathability and nice wide adjustable cuffs, this jacket is a solid purchase that we highly recommend for anyone who plans to spend a lot of active time in a harness or helmet.

Read review: Black Diamond Dawn Patrol - Women's

Notable for Exceptional Pockets


Rab Upslope - Women's



$264.95
at Backcountry
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Weight: 22.3 oz | Number of pockets: 6 (2 hand, 2 chest, 1 sleeve, 1 internal)
Six zippered pockets
Fantastic wind resistance
Helmet-compatible hood
Adjustable cuffs
Expensive
Heavy
Less water resistant than other tested models
We enjoyed testing the Rab Upslope and wanted to recognize the fact that it had great pockets, both in number and placement. With two pockets on the chest, two for the hands, one on the sleeve, and one internal - all zippered - this is an amazing contender for those that love having a place to stash all kinds of treasures and treats. The chest pockets are mesh-lined and large (spanning from the rib cage to under the armpits), so they not only help aid in breathability quite a bit, but they can also be used for impromptu cross-chest hand warmers. Besides the plethora of pockets, we loved the wind resistance, large helmet-compatible hood, and generously wide adjustable cuffs on the Upslope. It's an expensive softshell, and also quite heavy, but for the right winter adventurer, this is a sweet piece to own.

Read review: Rab Upslope - Women's

select up to 5 products
Score Product Price Our Take
79
$349
Editors' Choice Award
The Gamma MX Hoody will keep you protected, comfortable, and moving with ease across all manner of outdoor adventures.
79
$249
Top Pick Award
Other than some issues with durability, the OR Ascendant Hoody was an incredible layer, providing warmth, breathability, and weather protection.
77
$249
Top Pick Award
The Gamma LT Hoody is a durable, breathable, great fitting softshell with excellent water resistance that we loved having at the crag and for aerobic hikes.
76
$199
With incredible four-way stretch material and a generous fit, the Dawn Patrol was one of the most comfortable pieces in our softshell review.
72
$265
With six mesh-lined pockets, excellent wind resistance, and fantastic durability, the Upslope provided a top-of-the-line experience no matter where we took it.
66
$185
Best Buy Award
While the Moblis isn't the most breathable or water resistant jacket, it's warm, flexible, comfortable, and affordable.
64
$99
Best Buy Award
The Ferrosi Crosstown is a non-technical layer styled like a fun sweatshirt that we loved for some applications but wouldn't use for any kind of inclement weather.
61
$199
With good wind resistance and a warm fleece liner, the Adze Hoody performed well in cold snowy environments, despite its stiffness and slightly boxy fit.
59
$229
While feature-rich, windproof, and waterproof, we found the Apex Flex to be a bit underwhelming with some fit and performance problems.
57
$59
While we found the simple Axis fine for very mild weather and non-technical activities, it isn't built for serious athletes or inclement weather.
44
$135
While we appreciated the price point and the water resistance of the North Landing, overall it lacked the features and performance of the rest of our contenders.

Analysis and Test Results


The softshell is an interesting article of clothing because it strives to do so much in one layer: resist wind, repel water, and breathe well. It aims to be a comfort piece and a protection piece at the same time. Unlike potentially life-saving layers such as protective, waterproof hardshells and insulation layers that are essential to your outdoor layering kit, a softshell is nice to have, but it won't keep you warm or dry enough if you get caught in an unexpected storm. The primary objective of a softshell is to increase comfort through breathability and supple flexibility while offering some degree of weather protection. These layers are less stiff, noisy, and suffocating than hardshells, making them more pleasant to wear, but they just don't offer the same level of weather protection.

Our Editors' Choice Gamma MX and our Top Pick for Warmth  the Ascendant Hoody  get ready for a sunny but very windy day at the crag.
Our Editors' Choice Gamma MX and our Top Pick for Warmth, the Ascendant Hoody, get ready for a sunny but very windy day at the crag.

Weather Protection


A softshell will never be as fully protective from the weather as a hardshell because hardshells are waterproof and windproof. While there are some windproof softshells available, the designation of "waterproof" is by and large reserved for hardshells. Most softshells are designated as water and wind resistant. Some of the hybrid designs that we tested have waterproof parts, but these jackets should not be worn as rain jackets in a bad storm. Overall, softshells are ideal for mild weather where some moderate protection from wind and water is needed, but where full storm protection isn't required. When evaluating for weather protection, we took into consideration both wind resistance and water resistance.


Only two of the models we tested this time around were fully windproof, though many of them did impressively well with intense gusts and cold. The North Face Apex Flex GTX is considered a rainjacket/softshell hybrid and was the only jacket we tested that claimed to be both windproof and waterproof - an anomaly for a "softshell".

The Upslope  pictured here  was among the best of the best when it came to weather protection.
The Upslope, pictured here, was among the best of the best when it came to weather protection.

Constructed with Gore-tex, the Apex Flex was indeed an impressive wind barrier but, when given a dousing, we were underwhelmed with its ability to keep water entirely out. And while it had no problem keeping blowing snow and cold at bay, the stiff material and strange fit of this jacket meant that, when active, it tended to move around and annoyingly expose areas of the body to the elements.

To practice self-arrest techniques  we cinched the bottom of the Apex Flex. This stiff Gore-tex shell was indeed protective  but if you look closely here you can see how much the bottom of the jacket rode up when our arms were extended. This even happened when just wearing a backpack with the waist belt secured.
To practice self-arrest techniques, we cinched the bottom of the Apex Flex. This stiff Gore-tex shell was indeed protective, but if you look closely here you can see how much the bottom of the jacket rode up when our arms were extended. This even happened when just wearing a backpack with the waist belt secured.

The other windproof model we tested was our Best Buy winner, the comfortable and attractive Marmot Moblis. While this heavy fleece-lined jacket did not repel large amounts of water particularly well, we were happily warm and cozy while hiking through frigid alpine wind and blowing snow.

While not quite as technical a jacket as others we tested  we appreciated the warmth and good fit of the Marmot Moblis.
While not quite as technical a jacket as others we tested, we appreciated the warmth and good fit of the Marmot Moblis.

The Patagonia Adze Hoody had a fleece lining which made it quite warm and wind resistant. Its DWR-finish also helped considerably with water resistance, though overall this jacket was stiff and fell short in a few areas. Hybrid models can be tricky and tend to miss the mark somewhere in their design due to trying to cover too many bases. However, hybrid designs that are stiffer (and therefore usually less comfortable) can be useful for more specific applications such as ice climbing or skiing where more weather protection is needed and beneficial. Even more specialized than the already specialized softshell, hybrid jackets are tools for a focused athlete rather than the general outdoorswoman who is in the market for a multi-use jacket.

The Adze Hoody was a bit stiff and boxy  but the fleece lining and heavy weight of this shell did indeed keep us warm and protected on a frigid day hiking through alpine glaciers.
The Adze Hoody was a bit stiff and boxy, but the fleece lining and heavy weight of this shell did indeed keep us warm and protected on a frigid day hiking through alpine glaciers.

Other notable mentions for wind resistance were the Rab Upslope and the Black Diamond Dawn Patrol Hoody, both of which provided a significant wind barrier, but weren't as warm or as water resistant as other models. Our Top Pick for Warmth, the Outdoor Research Ascendant Hoody was, no surprise, impressively warm and cozy. The Ascendant also proved itself to be one of the more water resistant softshell jackets in our test group, though the lack of zippers on the hand pockets meant moisture could sneak in and hideout. Both Arc'teryx jackets we tested, our Editors' Choice, the Gamma MX Hoody, and our Top Pick for Rock Climbing, the Gamma LT Hoody handled wind like pros. The Gamma LT had a bit better water resistance, but the Gamma MX was considerably thicker and noticeably warmer.

Our Editors' Choice Gamma MX struck a great balance of comfort  mobility  and weather protection  fully encompassing what a softshell should be.
Our Editors' Choice Gamma MX struck a great balance of comfort, mobility, and weather protection, fully encompassing what a softshell should be.

Breathability


Breathability is the reason why people buy softshell jackets. If your primary need is weather protection, then you want a fully waterproof hardshell. However, when you plan to get your blood moving, a hardshell can feel suffocating and stuffy. Enter the softshell. Finding a piece that strikes the perfect balance between breathability and weather protection is key. It's not an easy task (but we're here to help!), and you should take into consideration what activities you plan to engage in the most.


We tested these softshells in a variety of conditions during some different activities. The most telling is when we wore them for high exertion activities such as climbing, hiking, or skiing. These kinds of activities get the blood moving and the sweat flowing. A few competitors scored well in this category simply because they were constructed with very thin material. While we recognize that thin material and breathability are not the same things, we couldn't ignore the fact that models with thin fabric are often just breathable by default.

The thing to remember is that, ultimately, you want a breathable jacket that can also resist weather and keep you warm when needed. Our Best Buy on a Tight Budget, the Outdoor Research Ferrosi Crosstown Hoody and the very simple and affordable Charles River Axis were both highly breathable, but we would hesitate from wearing them on a windy, cold, or wet day. The Arc'teryx Gamma LT Hoody was wonderfully breathable and struck a better balance between ventilation and weather protection; however, it will still leave you cold if you're not keeping your heart rate up when the temperature dips or weather takes a turn for the worse.

The Gamma LT Hoody was brilliant for mild days and aerobic activities.
The Gamma LT Hoody was brilliant for mild days and aerobic activities.

The Arc'teryx Gamma MX Hoody was one of the most breathable in the fleet. It manages to do this without compromising its ability to protect from inclement weather, which is the main reason it won our Editors' Choice award for the second year in a row. The unique OR Ascendant Hoody, our Top Pick for Warmth, also had impressive breathability - something we didn't expect from the onset because of its fuzzy plush interior. The Ascendant has some durability issues, but when looking at just breathability and weather protection, it's an incredibly impressive layer. Other notable mentions in this category were the Black Diamond Dawn Patrol and the Rab Upslope which has an impressive amount of mesh-lined pockets. Many of the contenders that fared the best in this category have mesh-lined pockets which can be left unzipped and used as vents when more ventilation is needed.

The two large mesh-lined chest pockets on the Upslope were fantastic for increasing breathability. We also found them useful for using our armpits as emergency handwarmers!
The two large mesh-lined chest pockets on the Upslope were fantastic for increasing breathability. We also found them useful for using our armpits as emergency handwarmers!

The models with the least breathability were some of the stiff fleece-lined models, namely the Patagonia Adze Hoody and the Mountain Hardwear North Landing. Our windproof models, the Marmot Moblis and The North Face Apex Flex GTX (despite being the only model with pit zips) also struggled in this category.

Mobility


Mobility is important in a softshell jacket because these layers are designed to be worn during activities that involve raising the heart rate through a lot of movement. A restrictive jacket will not allow you to move freely enough to enjoy your sport. We looked for jackets that fit well, layered well, and had designs tailored towards motion. We ended up with a diverse set of contenders whose performances spread all over the board.


The Black Diamond Dawn Patrol rose to the top in this category. Designed for climbing and skiing, this shell is constructed with four-way stretch fabric and underarm gussets. With a generous cut that does not ride up when the arms are lifted, this is a natural layer to put on and forget you're wearing - which is a good thing. Our Editors' Choice, the Arc'teryx Gamma MX, with gusseted underarms and articulated elbows, performed almost as well in this category, but the hood is a bit smaller and the tight cuffs are not adjustable - little details that we noticed while wearing and moving.

The Dawn Patrol was built for movement - no matter what we decided to do it served us well.
The Dawn Patrol was built for movement - no matter what we decided to do it served us well.

Another stellar choice for mobility was our Top Pick for Rock Climbing, the Arc'terx Gamma LT. It also has gusseted underarms and an athletic cut that was both flattering and easy to move in. Both models from Outdoor Research that we tested did great in this metric as well. The thin sweatshirt-esque OR Ferrosi Crosstown and the plush, cozy Ascendant never once felt constrictive or impeded our movement in any way.

The lightweight and agile Ferrosi Metro Hoody was a simple layer styled like a sweatshirt that  while not warm  was great for sunny days where you just need a little something extra on your body.
The lightweight and agile Ferrosi Metro Hoody was a simple layer styled like a sweatshirt that, while not warm, was great for sunny days where you just need a little something extra on your body.

We found the Mountain Hardwear North Landing to be tight across the shoulders and armpits and devoid of any stretch, two things that impeded our ease of movement. The arms were also slightly short, the neck a bit constricting when fully zipped up, and the hood quite small - a less than winning combination, to put it mildly. The other jacket that fell short here was The North Face Apex Flex GTX.

The stiff material caused the back hem to annoyingly ride up when wearing a pack or, honestly, with any movement other than everyday walking. The description for this shell on the manufacturer website describes an "ultra soft" jacket with a "stretch-woven exterior for extra mobility". This was not our experience at all with the Flex GTX. However, we did notice after purchasing our jacket that the solid colors and heather colors apparently have entirely different material compositions. The solid colors are constructed with 92% polyester and 8% elastane, while the heathered ones are 60% polyester, 33% nylon, and 7% elastane. We can only surmise that the soft and supple jacket described - and raved about by many reviewers! - is unique to the solid colors and, unfortunately, not a heathered one like the model we tested.

Weight


The Patagonia Adze Hoody weighed in at a whopping 25.3 oz and was the heaviest jacket in our review, followed closely by The North Face Apex Flex GTX at 24.7 oz.


On the other end of the spectrum was the featherweight 10.9 oz OR Ferrosi Crosstown Hoody - no surprise, because it was a very thin jacket (read: not incredibly warm). Much more impressive to us was the fact that our Top Pick for Warmth, the OR Ascendant Hoody was barely any heavier at 11.5 oz. The difference in warmth and weather protection between these two jackets was substantial, to say the least, despite the mere 0.6 oz difference in weight.

Even if you have to bring another jacket along for warmth  the 10.9-ounce Ferrosi won't take up hardly any room in your pack and can comfortably be used as an underlayer.
Even if you have to bring another jacket along for warmth, the 10.9-ounce Ferrosi won't take up hardly any room in your pack and can comfortably be used as an underlayer.

Also worth noting was the 17.1 oz Arc'teryx Gamma MX Hoody, our two-time Editors' Choice award winner, as well as our Top Pick for Rock Climbing, the 15.3 oz Arc'teryx Gamma LT Hoody. Both were outstanding jackets across the board.

The Ascendant Hoody was extremely warm for how little it weighed. We were impressed.
The Ascendant Hoody was extremely warm for how little it weighed. We were impressed.

Features


The shells in this review came with a fairly similar list of features aside from a few exceptions. Each one except the OR Ferrosi Crosstown Hoody had an adjustable hem; all except the Charles River Axis and the OR Ferrosi had zippered hand pockets. All models except the Charles River Axis had hoods. Of the jackets with hoods, all of them were helmet-compatible except for the Marmot Moblis, Mountain Hardwear North Landing, and The North Face Apex Flex GTX. The Marmot Moblis and The North Face Apex Flex were the only two windproof models (as opposed to just wind resistant), and the Apex Flex was also the only waterproof Gore-tex piece.


Some shells are designed with a specific purpose in mind. For instance, the Black Diamond Dawn Patrol is targeted towards ice and alpine climbers, and the Rab Upslope is optimized for ski mountaineering and alpine ascents. Because of this, they both have features that climbers, skiers, and mountaineers look for, such as helmet-compatible hoods, wide adjustable cuffs that easily and comfortably fit over large gloves, and strategically placed pockets. The Black Diamond Dawn Patrol, and other jackets geared toward movement like the Arc'teryx Gamma LT, our Top Pick for Rock Climbing, have gusseted underarms for added mobility. Our Editors' Choice, the Arc'teryx Gamma MX also has underarm gussets, as well as articulated elbows for even more ease of movement.

You know it's going to be a good adventure day when your jacket moves well  keeps you warm  and also allows you to get in your pockets with a harness on. Shown here is the Gamma MX Hoody.
You know it's going to be a good adventure day when your jacket moves well, keeps you warm, and also allows you to get in your pockets with a harness on. Shown here is the Gamma MX Hoody.


One feature that varies quite a bit from jacket to jacket is the sleeve cuffs. Typically a model will either have adjustable cuffs with a velcro tab or stretchy, non-adjustable cuffs. Of course, there are plusses and minuses to each style. The adjustable cuffs can be cinched around the outside of gloves to keep wind and water away from the wrists, but they are harder to fit underneath gloves with long gauntlets. The stretch woven cuffs more easily fit with gloves of this style. It can be nice not to have to fiddle with the cuff adjustment all the time, but having the option to wear the sleeves either way can be beneficial.

While we loved the wide adjustable cuffs on the Upslope for most things  they did get a bit bunched up and cumbersome when wearing gloves with longer gauntlets.
While we loved the wide adjustable cuffs on the Upslope for most things, they did get a bit bunched up and cumbersome when wearing gloves with longer gauntlets.

One other feature that also shows a lot of diversity across jackets is the hood. While all but one of our tested shells offered a hood, there was a lot of variation. The jackets geared toward sports that involve wearing a helmet, like the Upslope, Dawn Patrol, Adze Hoody, and both Arc'teryx models, all had 2-way adjustability, brims, and extra room to allow unimpeded movement with or without a helmet. Some other simpler hoods, like those on the Ascendant, and Ferrosi, still fit over a helmet (albeit snugly) but were only adjustable one-way and didn't have a brim. The Moblis and Apex Flex both offered 2-way adjustability, but neither was helmet-compatible. And the North Landing was small and didn't adjust at all.

On the left is the large hood of the Dawn Patrol without a helmet (very roomy!)  and on the right is the smaller but sufficient Gamma MX hood cinched up with a helmet underneath.
On the left is the large hood of the Dawn Patrol without a helmet (very roomy!), and on the right is the smaller but sufficient Gamma MX hood cinched up with a helmet underneath.

Some other notable features in our test group included a thumb loop on the Outdoor Research Ascendant and full-on built-in hand warmers on the Charles River Axis. The OR Ferrosi Crosstown Hoody offers a key clip in one of its pockets, and The North Face Apex Flex GTX was the only model with pit zips. The Black Diamond Dawn Patrol and the Patagonia Adze Hoody are both Bluesign approved, an emerging certification for sustainable textile production.

The Ascendant has thumb loops hidden inside the cuffs - they were a fun feature  but not the most comfortable.
The Ascendant has thumb loops hidden inside the cuffs - they were a fun feature, but not the most comfortable.

Style


Though style is very subjective, we still felt it deserved a seat at the table. Who wants to wear an ugly or ill-fitting jacket? Especially a $200+ ugly ill-fitting jacket. We evaluated each one based on how classic or versatile their look was, how well it fit, and how easily it could be worn in day-to-day applications.


We found ourselves grabbing the Arc'teryx Gamma MX Hoody more than any other jacket. Whether we were climbing up icy slopes or just running to the grocery store, this layer seemed to always fit the bill. It's tailored beautifully, looks stylish, and handles the elements with expertise - no wonder it's our Editors' Choice award winner for the second time in a row. Our other Arc'teryx, the Gamma LT Hoody wasn't far behind. With a slim athletic cut creating attractive, clean lines, this is an obviously well-made jacket. It's no secret that Arc'teryx makes beautiful clothing and gear.

No matter what we were doing  we felt stylish and classy doing it in the Gamma MX Hoody.
No matter what we were doing, we felt stylish and classy doing it in the Gamma MX Hoody.

Both shells from Outdoor Research, the Ferrosi Crosstown Hoody and the Ascendant Hoody had a casual sporty look. The Ferrosi is styled like a sweatshirt, which gave it a fresh appeal. The Charles River Axis was also a decently attractive layer, the built-in hand warmers adding nicely to the simple look. The rest of the contenders in this review had a bit more technical and less casual appearance, though of those we found the Rab Upslope and the Marmot Moblis to be a bit more flattering and simple to wear in everyday situations.

While more technical looking than some of our other models  the Upslope is an attractive jacket.
While more technical looking than some of our other models, the Upslope is an attractive jacket.

Conclusion


With the many different types of shells and layers on the market, it can be hard to know which pieces will work best for your individual needs. If you're still feeling unsure as to whether you need a softshell, hardshell, rain jacket, baselayer, or some combination of the above, have a look at our Buying Advice article. For even more information on the intricacies of layering for the outdoors, check out our Introduction to Layered Clothing Systems article. We hope that this review has answered some of your softshell questions and helped guide you toward the right model for your next outdoor adventure.

While a softshell may not be the most important layer in your closet  it's a wonderful piece to have on hand for all kinds of swing season adventures.
While a softshell may not be the most important layer in your closet, it's a wonderful piece to have on hand for all kinds of swing season adventures.
Penney Garrett

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