The Best Sleeping Bags for Camping

We took these bags on a tour of the west. We tested them side-by-side from Zion to Yellowstone to see which earns a space in your favorite adventure-mobile. After researching the top options available, we bought the best and lugged them from one campfire to another, conducting rigorous experiments along the way. We used a laser thermometer to test warmth, exposed ourselves to cruelly cold temperatures, and even conducted the infamous ice cub test. These bags capitalize on comfort. With spacious cuts, thick and warm fabrics, and thoughtful features, they do their best to guarantee a restful night beneath the stars. But, you wouldn't want to stuff many of them into a backpack. If you want a lighter, less luxurious option, head over to our Backpacking Bag Review. If you're looking for the coziest camping imaginable, keep reading.

Read the full review below >

Test Results and Ratings

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Analysis and Award Winners


Review by:
Jason Wanlass
Review Editor
OutdoorGearLab

Last Updated:
Monday
May 14, 2018

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Spring 2018 Update
We just tested the Teton Sports Polara 3-in-1 fleece lined bag against our long-time favorites. It offers versatility, and it's a cinch to toss the liner in the wash, but it just can't match the comfort and simple utility of our longstanding favorite bag, the Wenzel Grande. We recently added an affordable two-person bag, the X-Cheng Double, as well. Find out more below.

Our Favorite Bag


Wenzel Grande


Editors' Choice Award

$90 List
List Price
See It

Temperature Rating: 0F | Weight 13.6 lbs

Toasty and roomy
Extremely plush and comfortable
Rugged exterior lining
Soft flannel interior
Perfectly doubles as a quilt or ground cloth
Inexpensive
Heavy and bulky
Not appropriate for warm or wet weather
Somewhat difficult to roll up
Hats off to the Wenzel Grande for taking the cake for the second year in a row! One of the biggest models we tested (and by far the coziest), the Grande is the warmest bag we reviewed and the most comfortable… kind of like being rolled up in a heated cinnamon roll. What it may lack in fancy features, it makes up with its hardcore warmth and comfort capabilities. When it came down to it, we felt warmth and comfort were by far the most important features of any bag. After all, you're not going to care too much about an interior pocket or an over-sized, industrial zipper when you're snuggling down for a long night in the mountains and the temps are starting to plummet.

With its large size comes difficulty of storing it and cleaning it. If you want to wash this bag, you'll most likely be making your way to a laundromat with a large front loader. If you're tight on space on your camping trip, this is not the ideal bag. Even if you have plenty of space, it is still a massive bag that takes time to roll and store. That said, when you combine its incredible warmth and absolute comfort with its price tag, the Wenzel wins.

Read review: Wenzel Grande

Top Pick for Overall Versatility and Features


TETON Sports Polara 3-in-1


Top Pick Award

$110.02
at Amazon
See It

Temperature Rating: 0F | Weight 8.3 lbs

Very warm
Multiple unique features
Removable liner
Quality construction
Water resistant
Thick padding
May feel too confining for some users
Polar fleece liner is grabby
Somewhat difficult to pack into its stuff sack

All about the bells and whistles? The Teton Sports Polara 3-in-1 may be the bag for you. Slated as our Top Pick For Overall Versatility and Features, this monster of a bag is chocked full of loops, snaps, zippers, pockets, drawstrings and several versatile options for nearly every season or camp setting. The Polara's detachable fleece liner give campers a bag that is the perfect combination of your favorite couch-potato-movie blanket and a hardcore, cold-weather, camping bag. It's rugged and mean but also soft and very cozy.

If you're a busy sleeper and tend to twist and turn often, this bag may seem a bit confining in certain situations. Even though it's one of the larger bags we tested, when fully equipped with its very toasty polar fleece liner, some campers may feel too cocooned by the grabby nature of the lining material.

Read review: Teton Sports Polara 3-in-1

A Great Value Bag


Kelty Callisto 30


Best Buy Award

$44.95
at Amazon
See It

Temperature Rating: 20F | Weight 5 lbs

Adjustable top opening
Full synthetic construction
Large and roomy
Thick pillowy insulation
Water resistant
Narrow
Thin zipper baffle
The Callisto is now only available in a 30-degree rating and has had some aesthetic changes, as well as the addition of phone pocket. The price has dropped from $80 to $60! See the individual review for more information.

With a price tag of $60, the Callisto is not the cheapest bag we looked at, but its combination of comfort and warmth in a reasonably compact design make it the most bang for your buck. It's lighter than traditional flannel bags, but its roomy design along with its thick, pillowy insulation, make it one of our favorite general-purpose bags.

This bag is on the narrow side. It also has a pretty thin baffle that doesn't retain heat well. It's a warm weather bag. We wouldn't bring it if the temps get near freezing. We found the silky interior of the Callisto easy to move around in and feel its overall construction and size make it a tremendous value.

Read review: Kelty Callisto 30

Budget Bag for Two People


X-CHENG Double


X-CHENG Double  one of the best values in a camping sleeping bag.
Best Buy Award

$50 List
List Price
See It

Temperature Rating: 32F | Weight 9.3 lbs

Can be converted into two single bags
Great value
Comes with camp pillows
Poor stuff sack
Not warm below 40 degrees
We bought this bag with some skepticism: how could two sleeping bags cost $50 and come with two pillows? But after many car camping trips, we well it's the top value for two people. Did you get into a fight over who forgot camp fuel for the trip? No problem, the bags zip apart into two single bags for more personal space. In some sense, it's one of the top deals for a one person bag (each one only costs $25). Most two-person bags overwhelm standard washers. You have to use a giant front-loader at a laundry mat. With this bag, you can wash each one individually in most standard home washing machines.

This bag is not that warm. Even with two people in the bag, most will be cold when the temp drops below 40. The miserable quality stuff sack is thin and tears easily. It's cumbersome to get the bag back in the stuff sack. We recommend using a big long pillowcase or a duffel bag. This bag is cozy, but nearly as snug as the Wenzel Grande or the Country Squire. Other than those little gripes, this is a beautiful value.

Read review: X-CHENG Double

Top Pick for Overall Luxury


Slumberjack Country Squire 0


Slumberjack Country Squire 20
Top Pick Award

$186.99
at Amazon
See It

Temperature Rating: 0F | Weight 12.2 lbs

Massive, luxurious bag
Several unique features
Hearty zipper
Very warm
Removable cotton liner
Convenient zip-on duffel bag
Expensive
Not water resistant
Cream-colored interior prone to stains
Let's face it, if price isn't a factor, the Slumberjack Country Squire 0 still sets the bar for the most luxurious camping bag on the market. It's massive, warm, comfortable and rugged with a zip out liner that makes doing a quick washing simple and gives you the sensation of being snuggled up at home in your bed sheets. This bag is full of unique features, including a zip-off storage bag that can be used to carry tons of camp items from the car to the tent or trailer.

All that luxury makes this beast the most massive bag in the review. If your tight on car or closet space, this is not the right choice. It's HUGE fills most of the trunk space of a small car. The Slumberjack's overall quality and construction, including its 12oz Cotton Duck rugged exterior, makes this a bag that could last a lifetime.

Read review: Slumberjack Country Squire 0

The Wallet Friendly Favorite


Coleman Brazos


Coleman Brazos
Best Buy Award

$25.13
at Amazon
See It

Temperature Rating: 20F | Weight 4.1 lbs

Warmest bag for the price
Interior pocket
Patented zipper system reduces zipper snags
Not very roomy
Catchy/scratchy interior lining
At a price tag of just under $35, we didn't expect much from the Coleman Brazos. However, although cheap, this bag pleasantly surprised us when it outperformed more expensive bags during two of the most extensive, side-by-side warmth tests we've ever done. When it comes to keeping your piggies (and the rest of you) warm, this bag does the trick. The Brazos is a great grab if you're looking for a bargain bag that gets the job done. One thing to consider: This bag is one of the smallest bags we tested, so if you're over 6 feet tall and have a larger than average frame, you'll still hit your budget, but you're most likely going to be a bit uncomfortable.

Read review: Coleman Brazos

Top Pick for Multi-Purpose


REI Siesta 30


REI Co-op Siesta
Top Pick Award

$84.95
at REI
See It

Temperature Rating: 30F | Weight 3.6 lbs

The lightest bag we tested
Compressible
Comfortable liner
Quality Construction
Chocked full of features
Water resistant
Fits in a backpack
Relatively small
Doesn't stand up to colder weather
Love the conveniences of front-country campgrounds but are curious at trying your hand in the backcountry? The REI Siesta 30 is the lightest bag we tested and could be argued to have the most design features of all the bags we examined. The Siesta is a perfect warmer weather bag that we can quickly shove into a compression sack or bag compartment of most backpacks. While more substantial than many backcountry bags, the Siesta is still light enough to allow you use it on a multi-day, summer backpacking trip. Of all the traditional, rectangle designs we studied, the Siesta is the perfect multi-purpose bag.

Read review: REI Siesta 30

select up to 5 products
Score Product Price Our Take
81
$90
Editors' Choice Award
This old-school bag is tough as nails, super warm, ultra cozy... and it doesn't break the bank, winning our Editors' Choice award!
79
$260
Top Pick Award
If you're willing to shell out the bucks, this bag will not disappoint; it's pure luxury - almost like sleeping in your own bed.
72
$110
The Celsius's massive size, mixed with its red and black colors, make it appealing at first site, but the overall design and quality have room for improvement.
72
$100
The Dolomite 20 is a multi-purpose bag that is designed with all the care and attention to detail that The North Face products are known for.
70
$60
Best Buy Award
The Callisto 30 is our Best Buy; if you want to maximize your dollar, this bag gives you what you need at a reasonable cost.
70
$85
Top Pick Award
The Siesta 30 is a great all-purpose bag, which is why we selected it as our Top Pick for Dual Purpose.
61
$40
Best Buy Award
This bag is our Best Buy on a Tight Budget, as it's great for kids and smaller adults, and is warm and relatively durable.

Analysis and Test Results


Zipper draft tubes, 12-ounce duck cotton, shoulder baffles, multiple-layer off-set construction, continuous-filament insulation, cotton-poly flannel liners — blah, blah, blah. Yes, all of these features (and many more) are important things to consider when purchasing a sleeping bag. But when it all came down to it, we mostly cared about two things when the sun went down, and the cool mountain air began to settle: will it keep me warm and is it comfortable? In the end, a bag can have a zillion bells and whistles, but if it doesn't swallow you up like your favorite down comforter, and if it doesn't keep you warm, what's the point of forking over your hard-earned cash to buy it?

How did each bag stack up against each other? We committed hours and hours testing each bag to find out...so you didn't have to.
How did each bag stack up against each other? We committed hours and hours testing each bag to find out...so you didn't have to.

For this very reason, we weighted warmth as the highest priority when it came down to our scoring, followed closely by comfort. But we didn't do a few subjective, personal opinion tests. We took each bag and got an idea of how we felt about it, and then compared our opinions to basic science. And we weren't nice. We were tougher on these bags than ever before, and we were even harder on the few bags that we were testing for the second and third time in the last few years.

Value


Hover over the blue dots in the value chart to see our award winners. The Wenzel Grande is not only the highest scoring bag, it's also about the same price as the rest of the field. It would also be a Best Buy winner if it didn't take the Editors Choice award. Only one model, the Country Squire breaks the bank. The rest of the bags are about the same cost but excel in many different applications.


Warmth


Have you ever heard of a homeowner changing the insulation in their home as the weather changes? For instance, Summer is over, so the insulation that was keeping your home cool needs to be swapped out for different insulation that will keep your home toasty on cold Winter nights. Does that sound right to you? Of course not.


When it comes to thermal insulation, it doesn't matter whether it's keeping something cool or something hot, it all works the same way — by trapping temperature in dead air space.

Whether it's goose down or synthetic material  thermal insulation all does the same thing: It has millions upon millions of tiny pockets of dead air space  which traps holds in temperature... cold or warm.
Whether it's goose down or synthetic material, thermal insulation all does the same thing: It has millions upon millions of tiny pockets of dead air space, which traps holds in temperature... cold or warm.

Of course, with the sleeping bags we looked at, we only cared about how warm they kept us — especially when we visited Bryce Canyon National Park, where the nighttime temps were still nearing the teens.

In Bryce Canyon National Park  we left the bags stacked outside on a picnic table for several hours until the outer temperature of the bags were below 20 degrees. Then  we conducted an extensive warmth test. We used this laser thermometer in several of our warmth tests to help us determine if our subjective feeling of warmth corresponded to the bag's actual ability to insulate.
In Bryce Canyon National Park, we left the bags stacked outside on a picnic table for several hours until the outer temperature of the bags were below 20 degrees. Then, we conducted an extensive warmth test. We used this laser thermometer in several of our warmth tests to help us determine if our subjective feeling of warmth corresponded to the bag's actual ability to insulate.

To get our results, we ran the bags through several tests to determine their ability to retain temperature, and then we compared these results to what our guts told us. In one specific test, we left the bags outside to cool down to 19 degrees and then got inside each one for 10 minutes. During this test, we rated based on how warm they felt to us and compared that to the actual interior temperature of the bags that we obtained with our laser thermometer. Then we combined our results for an overall warmth score. Our warmth scores accounted for 35 percent of each bag's total rating. For more on this test, check out our How We Test section.

A block of ice was placed into each bag for one hour. Based on our results  we feel the Wenzel Grande kept in the chill better than any bag we tested.
A block of ice was placed into each bag for one hour. Based on our results, we feel the Wenzel Grande kept in the chill better than any bag we tested.

To double check our warmth tests, we decided to try a little reverse psychology on each bag. We figured if they could keep things (us) warm, then they should be able to keep things cold. If our theory proved to be correct, the toastiest bags should also keep a massive block of ice the coldest. Our hunch was right. Check out more about our ice test in our How We Test section.

For us, the Wenzel Grande handily outperformed the all the rest in all of our warmth tests, followed closely by the Slumberjack Country Squire 0 and the Teton Sports Polara. If all the elements of the perfect cup of hot chocolate became a sleeping bag, the result would be the Wenzel Grande. Its overstuffed design proved to be incredibly cozy and warm. In fact, we found it a challenge to want to unzip and get up for the day after sleeping toasty in the Wenzel all night.

Once we snuggled into our Editor's Choice Winner  the Wenzel Grande  it was really hard to find the desire to get back out. We loved its soft flannel interior and its over-stuffed design.
Once we snuggled into our Editor's Choice Winner, the Wenzel Grande, it was really hard to find the desire to get back out. We loved its soft flannel interior and its over-stuffed design.

The bag that surprised us the most was the Coleman Brazos. Tipping the scales at just under $35, we were prepared to be underwhelmed. Boy were we wrong. While not the warmest bag we tested, the Brazos warmth ratings outperformed several other bags that cost three times as much, like the REI Siesta, Kelty Callisto, and The North Face Dolomite, while going head to head with the TETON Sports Celsius XXL 0.

Comfort


Did you ever play with those balsa-wood, rubber band airplanes when you were a kid? Remember winding up the propeller until the rubber band was in a myriad of knots?


Have you ever felt like that rubber band after trying to get a good night's sleep in a sleeping bag that's the size of a shrunken wool sock and has the surface friction of sandpaper? Maybe we're erring on the side of dramatic, but you get our drift, right?

Morning stretching on the soft linings of the Wenzel Grande. The Grande and Conquest complement each other well  and in addition to making great blankets  can be zipped together to make a giant flannel-lined mega bag.
Morning stretching on the soft linings of the Wenzel Grande. The Grande and Conquest complement each other well, and in addition to making great blankets, can be zipped together to make a giant flannel-lined mega bag.

When you're already far from the comforts of home — camping in a trailer, tent, or car — nothing's worse than being trapped like a buried mummy all night. That's why we tested all of our bags for more than one type of comfort. Yes, bigger bags offer more roomy pleasure, and the Wenzel Grande, Slumberjack Country Squire 0 and the Teton Sports Celsius XXL all took the gold in this measurement. But size isn't the only thing that matters. A bag can have enough room for two people, but if the interior lining is grabby, tossing and turning during the night may turn into a never-ending wrestling match with a life-size cocoon. For this reason, we decided to squirm back and forth, over and over, in each bag for what seemed like an eternity to find out which allowed us to toss and turn with the most ease.

Have you ever felt like this after spending an entire night wrestling a your sleeping bag? We thoroughly tested each bag on our list to find out which one allowed for the easiest tossing and turning.
Have you ever felt like this after spending an entire night wrestling a your sleeping bag? We thoroughly tested each bag on our list to find out which one allowed for the easiest tossing and turning.

The Slumberjack Country Squire 0 scored the highest in our twisting-turning test. Its bed-sheet-like interior allows for ease of movement even with clothes on. Which one performed the worst? The Coleman Brazos. We found its interior to be extremely uncomfortable, which is not what we're looking for when trying to get a good night's sleep for the early next day start. The Teton Sports Polara's fleece lining also tends to latch on to clothing, but not enough to detract from its overall comfort factor.

Letting our feet air out while testing for comfort.
Letting our feet air out while testing for comfort.

Another area of comfort we tested was each bag's overall thickness and loft. To us, puffy, thick bags just felt better on cold nights. They also offer more natural padding. To determine which bags were "full of it," we spent a considerable amount of time inside each bag, lying around on hard, flat, bare sandstone rock. Trust us, we now know which bags have the most natural padding, and we have the hip and shoulder bruises to prove it. In this area, the Wenzel Grande and the Kelty Callisto 20 scored the highest for their overall coziness.

Features


If you strip away all of our differences, most people are like cats. We like to be doted on and tend to whine until someone takes care of us; we hate getting wet (swimming and skinny dipping aside), and we like to be clean — at least most of us do.


In all, there were 11 features we explored with each bag. For a list of all of them, stop by our How We Test area to read more. Out of all 11, we felt there were three that were the most practical and important; we are going back to the cat thing here.

While the sleeping pad sleeve on the NEMO Loft is a nice feature  it won't fit large deluxe pads like the Therm-a-rest Luxury Map.
While the sleeping pad sleeve on the NEMO Loft is a nice feature, it won't fit large deluxe pads like the Therm-a-rest Luxury Map.

Warranty - We like to be taken care of when we buy something. The Kelty Callisto 20, The North Face Dolomite 20, Teton Sports Celsius XXL and the Slumberjack Country Squire 0 all boast limited lifetime warranties. The Wenzel Grande has a 10-year limited warranty, while the Coleman Brazos has a 5-year limited warranty. REI has a famously generous return policy, but when we checked their website, the warranty information for the REI Siesta 30 was vague. REI's standard return policy is one year, to our knowledge.

Water Resistance - Nothing is worse than sleeping in a wet sleeping bag. Outside water sources like a downpour can make for a miserable night. A leaky roof or trickling groundwater can lead to being cold and wet.

We doused each bag with 16 ounces of water and let it sit for 5 minutes to see which bag had the best water resistance.
We doused each bag with 16 ounces of water and let it sit for 5 minutes to see which bag had the best water resistance.

We found the synthetic bags, the Kelty Callisto 20, The North Face Dolomite 20, REI Siesta 30, and Teton Sports Celsius XXL performed brilliantly in our water tests. Left way behind in the pack were the Slumberjack Country Squire 0, the Wenzel Grande and the Coleman Brazos, with the Slumberjack showing virtually no resistance to water (at least in the tests we did).

Most synthetic bags really hold their own when it comes to repelling water. The REI Siesta 30  seen here  didn't let a drop penetrate after a full five minutes.
Most synthetic bags really hold their own when it comes to repelling water. The REI Siesta 30, seen here, didn't let a drop penetrate after a full five minutes.

Ease of Cleaning - We won't sugar coat it for you. We were disappointed pretty much across the board. The instructions on every bag we tested instructed us to use a front-loading washer. Almost all the instructions said that both the washer and dryer needed to be commercial grade, which means you're headed to the laundromat every time you want to clean your bag. No dry cleaning allowed either. We figured that since this was the standard for most, that it wasn't that big of a drawback. Just a little time-consuming.

The bag that scored the lowest was the Teton Sports Celsius XXL. Its instructions specifically detail washing the bag by hand and laying flat to dry. Its guidelines also state that machine-washing the bag voids its warranty. The same goes for the Teton Sports Polara 3-in-1. But you can also throw its fleece liner in the wash, making for a pretty easy "half clean" option.

The Slumberjack Country Squire 0  seen here  along with the Wenzel Grande offer virtually no resistance to water. A common issue with natural fiber bags.
The Slumberjack Country Squire 0, seen here, along with the Wenzel Grande offer virtually no resistance to water. A common issue with natural fiber bags.

There were many other features we looked for in each bag. Some of them are zipper function, interior pockets, and adjustable shoulder baffles. Our How We Test section further details the steps that we took when comparing the contenders side-by-side.

We were the most disappointed with washing instructions for the Teton Sports Celsius XXL.
We were the most disappointed with washing instructions for the Teton Sports Celsius XXL.

Packed Size


Traditional sleeping bags are known for being a little "big-boned," so packed size was not a complete deal-breaker for us. However, whether your backpacking in the Tetons or Car camping through Yellowstone, space still comes at a premium, so we still rated each bag according to its stowed size. We investigated a little further for you.


Traditional bags are known for being large and roomy. The second largest one we tested, the Slumberjack Country Squire 0, comes in at a whopping 84 inches long and 42 inches wide. And of course a bag this size isn't going to slide into a dainty, compression stuff sack conveniently.

Simply ranking each bag according to its packed size wasn't enough for us. We also took the time to see how easy the fit into their stuff sacks  and whether they could fit into a backpack.
Simply ranking each bag according to its packed size wasn't enough for us. We also took the time to see how easy the fit into their stuff sacks, and whether they could fit into a backpack.

We asked, "Does the bag fit in its designed storage bag?" And even more importantly — "Does it fit easily into its storage bag?" There's nothing worse than when stowing your bag has more action than an MMA fight. Most of the bags fit effortlessly into their storage bag, and surprisingly, the biggest bag, the Slumberjack Country Squire 0, was one of the easiest to stow. Testing determined that the Wenzel Grande and the Teton Sports Celsius XXL the most difficult to store, but with a little elbow grease, we were able to get them back into their storage devices.

When stored  the Strato Loft is 1/4 the size of the Country Squire. With a compression sack  it would be half again the size.
When stored, the Strato Loft is 1/4 the size of the Country Squire. With a compression sack, it would be half again the size.


When it came to packed size, a third thing we looked at was the question of whether any of the bags had a small enough packed size, meaning that they could double as a backcountry bag on a multiple-day backpacking trip. And we found a few that legitimately could fit the bill. The top scorer was the REI Siesta 30. Weighing in at 3 lbs. 9 ozs., the REI Siesta is not the lightest bag on the planet, for this, check out the Backpacking Sleeping Bag or Ultralight Sleeping Bag reviews. However, we feel the REI Siesta 30 would do the job in a pinch or for someone who is trying backpacking for the first time and doesn't want to invest a lot of money on new gear.

We felt that packed sized was important  but we also took it a step further and found out which bags actually fit into their stuff sacks with ease. The REI Siesta 30  pictured here  almost fell into its sack! The Northface Dolomite 20 and the Slumberjack Country Squire 0 were also very easy to stow.
We felt that packed sized was important, but we also took it a step further and found out which bags actually fit into their stuff sacks with ease. The REI Siesta 30, pictured here, almost fell into its sack! The Northface Dolomite 20 and the Slumberjack Country Squire 0 were also very easy to stow.

The REI Siesta 30 and the The North Face Dolomite 20 pack up tight enough that they both can comfortably fit into the bag compartment of nearly any backpack (we stuffed them into several, all the way down to a 58-liter pack). Of course, the one thing you will sacrifice with these smaller, lighter bags is warmth. However, for most late Spring and Summer camping and backpacking, a 20 to 30-degree bag will suffice.

Conclusion


Throughout our review, we didn't give these bags any leeway. Regardless of price or prestige, we held all of the bags to high standards, and we were not afraid to score them according to their performance. We researched everything we would want to know if we were buying these bags for ourselves. In the end, we hope our efforts will benefit you in your decision making.

The Grande (on the ground) is perfect for just about anything. We used it as a ground cloth as much as we used it as a sleeping bag. The Kelty Callisto 20 (around the shoulders) came in second for having that nice  puffy  overstuffed feel.
The Grande (on the ground) is perfect for just about anything. We used it as a ground cloth as much as we used it as a sleeping bag. The Kelty Callisto 20 (around the shoulders) came in second for having that nice, puffy, overstuffed feel.

There's a lot to consider when buying a traditional sleeping bag. Hopefully, you've gained an insight into what we felt were the most important features of any conventional sleeping bag. When the rubber hits the road, the two most important considerations are warmth and comfort. The bags we liked the most were the ones that swallowed us up and kept us toasty all night. If you'd like to view a more detailed overview of each bag, we've done that for you too. All you have to do is click on each bag for more individual details.
Jason Wanlass

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Still not sure? Take a look at our buying advice article for more info.

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